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Kick Sugar at Work

Look around your workplace and take a note of the sugary foods that you see.  In the staff room, the vending machine, canteen and coffee bar the sweets, biscuits, chocolate bars and cakes are hard to miss.

Mid morning and late afternoon is when we’re most at likely to reach for a sugary drink or chocolate bar fix to boost our energy.  This is typically followed by another energy or mood low, as we trigger blood glucose and insulin spikes and dips, known as the ‘blood sugar rollercoaster’.

Instead try factoring in more standing time, walking during the day and ideally getting fresh air at intervals.  Walking meetings are ideal and dropping off messages instead of emailing colleagues helps to get you moving regularly.

To kick the sugar at work try:

  • Dumping any sugary snacks and drinks
  • Replace these unhealthy quick fix foods with healthier swaps, eg nuts, fruit, dried meats; cheese, hommus, cheese and vegetable sticks.
  • Drink plenty of water to keep you hydrated
  • Get a few of your colleagues together to join our Sugar Free – 14 day challenge!

 

Our Kick Sugar Workplace Programmes


HMRC Employee Wellbeing Support 

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Leafie.org led HM Revenues and Customs’s latest employee wellbeing telephone support session.  We shared and discussed information on nutritional strategies for the employees dialling in.

 

 


Student Health and Wellbeing 

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Leicester University Student Union and Leafie.org held a joint health and wellbeing event highlighting the importance of good nutrition in maintaining energy, focus and mental health for students during peak stress times.

Students were able to drop in for informal discussion on current eating habits, receive tips and general guidance on eating to support their physical and mental health.

 

BROSE Employee Wellbeing                        Brose

Brose UK car parts manufacturer asked Leafie.org to support their employee wellbeing drive.  Employees visited promotional stands to view demonstrations, chat about their own eating habits, ask questions and receive recipes, information and general advice around good nutrition habits for regulating energy, weight control, reducing disease risk and managing blood sugar.

 

 

 

 

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